Musings about digital communications, PR, social media & life…

Archive for February, 2012

New Blog Home

This blog is in transition to a new platform. Please visit my website for more information or subscribe to the new blog.


April Lynne Scott Social Media Content Strategies Management ContestsApril Lynne Scott Public Relations Strategies Branding Media Campaigns EventsApril Lynne Scott Digital Content Concepts Strategies Email Video Blogs


Advertisements

Giants #WIN, Advertisements #FAIL

For me, the Super Bowl was a great experience. My team won, I had the most amazing spicy guacamole to munch on during the game, and I had a great time with friends in person and online.

Mark Herzlich Super Bowl April Lynne Scott

Disappointed, though? Yes. Not with the game, but with the advertisers and their so-called “social media integration” I had high hopes for brands this year… high hopes for this being the catalyst to transform television into the social TV of the future. What a big let down.

Advertisers spend multiple millions of dollars per spot for the chance to put their brand in front of a very captive audience. The audience always shows up – eagerly rushing to their televisions… and twitter… at kickoff to see the game and participate in #brandbowl. But this year, the Advertisers didn’t show up.

Coca-Cola promised a full interactive experience featuring its famous polar bears: Their sites were down – oops!

Acura was successful in spiking interest in their new NSX [very sexy car] but their website wasn’t ready for the traffic.

Toyota is under fire for their twitter campaign that sent unsolicited @ replies to users tweeting with hashtags related to the big game.

At first glance, Doritos seems to again be a winner. Their ads gained ground in the hearts of #brandbowl aficionados and lived up to expectations. They also had success with the online and social components of their ads.

And, it turns out that pre-releasing commercials didn’t take away anticipation, but brought more viewers and users through social media.

Of course it’s still too early to tell if Super Bowl advertising will impact sales and offer a justifiable ROI. Time will tell.

According to stats from ExactTarget the most popular tweet was from Mark Herzlich, a Giant’s player who has battled with and come back from cancer, who tweeted:

2 yrs ago I was told I’d never walk again, just walked off plane to #indy to play in #superbowl #takethatcancer

Proving that the surest way to consumers hearts (well, human hearts) is the emotional connection. Maybe next year advertisers will either step out of their corporate boxes and be truly innovative, creative or even just plain goofy… or embrace their story and find a connection to their customers that will ring throughout the social galaxy.

Super-Social Super Bowl

Super Bowl Social Media April Lynne ScottI’ve been a football fan since I attended my first game at 2 weeks old. [That’s right – I said “2 weeks old”] I don’t remember a time I didn’t love the sport. As a kid, my team wasn’t good enough to go to the Super Bowl, but I still remember the anticipation waiting for the big game every year.

My team didn’t make it again this season, but this year I have something else to look forward to: The SuperMediaSocialBowl.

Super Bowl 46 promises to score by diving in head first to social media. Brands are embracing content marketing, social community engagement and integrating social media into their advertising more than ever before.

Super Bowl Social Media Command Center
50 social media experts have been interacting with fans in real-time during the weeks leading up to the game. All the way through the big event they’ll scour the socialnet for tweets and posts containing selected keywords to respond and engage at a moment’s notice. Teams are participating in Google+ hangouts, and fans are already responding by flooding social channels with virtual cheers.

These are not your daddy’s Super Bowl ads
Brands are going beyond adding silly little social media icons to the bottom of the TV screens. Toyota will request hashtag participation via twitter and then respond in real-time to tweeting fans. No word who will end up naked in the GoDaddy commercials this year, but they will incorporate QR codes into their advertisements. Coca-Cola, no stranger to the world of social media, will debut their famous polar bears as official commentators during the game. Although skeptical about this approach, I am anxious to see how it is received and if Coca-Cola views it as a success.

User-generated content is big again. Doritos is running a Crash the SuperBowl contest. NBC’s Jimmy Fallon is partnering with Subway to push Subs Across America showcasing user-generated video.

The Super Bowl is always must-see TV. This year it will be much more than that. Some will be venturing out to sports bars. Others will be drinking beer, tailgating, or having Super Bowl parties decked out with team paraphernalia. As for me, I will be hunkered down at my own command central – 3 screens, a TV, and a smartphone – cheering my team on to victory – and, also pulling for the underdog, social media. My fingers are crossed this will be the year social media will finally show up strong and prove the naysayers wrong.

[Go Giants!]

Social TV: Media + Conversation

Social TV: Media + ConversationRealizing they’re arriving a little late to this party, entertainment marketers are scrambling to find new ways to join the social media event. From awards shows to the upcoming Superbowl, show check-ins via GetGlue and TV tagging with Shazam, their aim is to increase fan loyalty and audience viewership in order to [fingers crossed] see a positive ROI – but are they just spinning their wheels?

The one-Way Conversation:
TV Check-ins are popular and slowly sticking to the industry’s marketing plans. While offering value (of sorts), check-ins come up empty in other important areas. TV Tagging is fun and also offers value through exclusive video, playlists and the like. Games are interactive and offer competition among fans. Twitter and Facebook community destinations are commonplace. Google+ and Pinterest are gaining steam, and hashtags grace the bottom of nearly every television screen these days.

Steps in the right direction? Yes. These are tools to target your audience. These are great ways for your audience to interact with each other. They are not ways to engage in conversation. This is what your audience craves – a conversation… with you.

Integration and the Two-way Conversation:
Entertainment marketers have proven to be fairly good students in the rapidly changing world of social and digital media. There’s something they’re just not getting. It’s fair to note that it isn’t just the entertainment industry missing this point. Even early social media adopters miss the “conversation” opportunity. Here’s what they’ll need to get started:

1) Take a Risk… Be Creative

It’s hard to believe that an industry in the business of make-believe lacks imagination. Whether it’s a lack of education about social media or fear of investing the time, money and resources, it’s inexcusable. This is television’s moment. It’s do or die – literally.

2) Integrate – Engage – Interact

Thank you, television, for allowing us – your loyal audience – to tweet about you during your show. Why isn’t anyone tweeting back? Hello? Is anyone out there?

Networks must find ways to integrate social channels into their broadcasts, engage in real time, and encourage audience interaction. We are here. We are waiting.

3) Knowledge is Power

Let’s be honest, this is a massive undertaking. Television networks are not small. Programming is 24/7. This is not your father’s entertainment marketing. Hire knowledgeable leadership. Build passionate teams.

Listen. Learn. Create. Connect. Respond. Repeat.

Social media is capable of saving TV. It’s doing a pretty darn good job on its own, but it could use a little help. Television’s future is bright considering it could have easily been lost to social media or replaced by the internet. The industry just doesn’t completely understand how to capitalize on social media…. yet.

%d bloggers like this: